Political Consequences of Rapid Economic Development: The Singapore Case

  • Jon S. T. Quah
Part of the Policy Studies Organization Series book series (PSOS)

Abstract

The People’s Action Party (PAP) won 43 of the 51 seats in the Singapore Legislative Assembly in the 30 May 1959 general election and went on to form the government. Since then it has been reelected seven times, in 1963, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984 and 1988.1 During the past 32 years of PAP rule there has been a great deal of economic development, as witnessed by the rapid growth of the citystate’s per capita indigenous gross national product (GNP) and the visible improvement in the population’s living standards as a result of successful public housing, family planning and industrialization programs. For example, Singapore’s per capita indigenous GNP increased more than 13-fold between 1960 and 1989, from S$1330 to S$17 910.2

Keywords

Economic Crisis Petroleum Transportation Income Expense 

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Policy Studies Organization 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon S. T. Quah

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