Enquiries into the Nature of Man

  • Anya Taylor
Part of the Coleridge’s Writings book series (COLWRIT)

Abstract

Disillusionment with politics in the late 1790s led Coleridge to conclude that the most important task for his generation was to investigate more deeply the nature of man: ‘What we are, and what we are capable of becoming’.1 His pronouncements on the subject often followed the traditional tripartite scheme of man’s being, as animal, as intellectual and as religious.2 As early as 1796 and continuing into his late work on the Logos, he planned ambitious schemes that would arrange human accomplishments under similar categories.3 For a long time he believed that Wordsworth’s great philosophical poem would be constructed according to a similar scheme, agreed, he claimed, during their earlier discussions.4

Keywords

Vortex Coherence Assimilation Manure Sine 

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Notes

  1. 3.
    Alice D. Snyder, Coleridge on Logic and Learning (New Haven, Conn., 1929) 1 pp. 4–8.Google Scholar
  2. 20.
    Richard Haven, Patterns of Consciousness: An Essay on Coleridge (Amherst, Mass.׃ 1969) p. 12.Google Scholar
  3. 25.
    Stephen Bygrave, Coleridge and the Self: Romantic Egotism (New York, 1986) p. 3.Google Scholar
  4. 26.
    Laurence S. Lockridge, Coleridge the Moralist (Ithaca, N.Y., and London, 1977) pp. 153–5.Google Scholar
  5. 28.
    Edward Kessler, Coleridge’s Metaphors of Being (Princeton, N.J., 1979) pp. 37.Google Scholar
  6. 69.
    I. Kant, Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, (Indianapolis, Indiana, 1979) pp. 45–6.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anya Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.John Jay College of Criminal JusticeThe City University of New YorkUSA

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