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Influences, Confluences, Resistancy: Romantic Powers and Victorian Strength

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Abstract

In the spring of 1798 Coleridge opened a political poem1 by presenting himself on high ground overlooking the sea and describing the beauty of the natural scenery about him: clouds floating and pausing above him, waves rolling beneath and woods around which, when they were not making a music of their own, were silent as if listening to the song of the night-birds. All had this in common: an element of unrestricted fluency.

Keywords

Human Mind Moral Evil Creative Power Paradise Lost Metaphorical Thinking 
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4 Influences, Confluences, Resistancy: Romantic Powers and Victorian Strength

  1. 58.
    R.J. Mann, Tennyson’s Maud Vindicated, an explanatory essay (1856).Google Scholar
  2. 63.
    A. Dwight Culler, Imaginative Reason, The Poetry of Matthew Arnold (New Haven, Conn., 1966) pp. 3–4.Google Scholar
  3. 85.
    See Francis Darwin (ed) The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887) I, 316n,Google Scholar
  4. 85.
    R. M. Young, Darwin’s Metaphor (Cambridge 1985) p. 112.Google Scholar
  5. 86x.
    Gillian Beer, Darwin’s Plots, Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eliot and Nineteenth-Century Fiction (1983). See especially her appraisal of Mary Hesse’s view of metaphor, pp. 91–2.Google Scholar
  6. 91.
    A. O.J. Cockshut, The Imagination of Charles Dickens (1961) pp. 170–82.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Beer 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CambridgeUK

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