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Cross Purposes: Literature, (In)discipline and Women’s Studies

  • Trev Broughton
Part of the Women’s Studies at York Series book series (WSYS)

Abstract

This chapter grew out of a series of reflections on my uprooting from a Department of English and transplantation to a Centre for Women’s Studies. For practical and institutional reasons, I have not, unlike many academics working on women’s-studies courses, retained a foothold in a ‘parent’ department, but have moved, lock, stock and typewriter, to my new home. This experience has been both exhilarating and disconcerting, and provides the starting point for these musings in the form of an arpeggio of questions: What am I? … doing? … here?

Keywords

Literary Critic Feminist Criticism Woman Writer Grand Narrative Feminist Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Trev Broughton

There are no affiliations available

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