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Building Materials

  • Stuart Johnson
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Building and Surveying Series book series

Abstract

Many of us are now in the habit of ferrying our empty bottles and yesterday’s newspapers to the recycling bins in our lead-free fuelled cars. This concern for the environment is beginning to change the way we behave during working hours, too. For all sorts of reasons, lots of companies are beginning to formulate environmental policies which influence the way in which they use their buildings. Reasons for adopting these policies vary, ranging from a desire on the part of occupiers of space to create a healthy environment for their workforce and customers, to a perception by developers that they must create buildings with a minimal environmental impact to meet the demands of an increasingly discerning market.

Keywords

Green Building Timber Treatment Sustainable Source Tropical Hardwood Building Occupant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Building Research Establishment, BRE Digest 358 CFCs and Buildings ( Watford: BRE, 1991 ) p. 2.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S. Curwell, C. March and R. Venables (eds), Buildings and Health — The Rosehaugh Guide to the Design, Construction, Use and Management of Buildings ( London: RIBA Publications, 1990 ) p. 108.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1988.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Health and Safety Commission, Approved Code of Practice — Safe Use of Pesticides for Non-agricultural Purposes ( London: HMSO, 1991 ).Google Scholar
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    Timber Research and Development Association, Wood Information Section 2/3 Sheet 30 ( High Wycombe: TRADA, 1987 ).Google Scholar
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    Department of the Environment and the Welsh Office, The Building Regulations 1991, Toxic Substances, Approved Document, D1 Cavity Insulation ( London: HMSO, 1991 ).Google Scholar
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    Timber Research and Development Association, TRADA Advisory Sheet 57 Getting Formaldehyde into Perspective ( High Wycombe: TRADA, 1990 ).Google Scholar
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    The Daily Telegraph and Friends of the Earth, 1990 Directory of Recycling ( London: The Daily Telegraph, 1989 ) p. 5.Google Scholar

Further reading

  1. Architects’ Journal, ‘Lead paint–a material analysed’, Architects’ Journal (12 September 1990 ) pp. 63–5.Google Scholar
  2. Architects’ Journal, ‘Tropical hardwoods–fruits of the forest’, Architects’ Journal (8 August 1990 ) pp. 45–52.Google Scholar
  3. Building Research Establishment, Digest 358 CFCs and Buildings ( Watford: BRE, 1991 ).Google Scholar
  4. A. H. Cockram and P. J. Arnold, Information Paper 7/84 Urea Formaldehyde Foam Cavity Wall Insulation: Reducing Formaldehyde Vapour in Dwellings ( Watford: BRE, 1984 ).Google Scholar
  5. S. Curwell, C. March and R. Venables (eds), Buildings and Health — The Rosehaugh Guide to the Design, Construction, Use and Management of Buildings ( London: RIBA Publications, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  6. S. Curwell, S. Fox and C. March, Use of CFCs in Buildings (Fernsheer, 1988 ).Google Scholar
  7. Dulux Trade literature produced by ICI Paints, Slough. Friends of the Earth, Good Wood Guide ( London: Friends of the Earth, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  8. Friends of the Earth, Good Wood Manual — Specifying Alternatives to Non-renewable Tropical Hardwoods ( London: Friends of the Earth, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  9. Health & Safety Executive, Remedial Timber Treatment in Buildings — A Guide to Good Practice and the Safe Use of Wood Preservatives ( London: HMSO, 1991 ).Google Scholar
  10. R. Lorch, What Are You Doing About the Environment? The Specifier and Building Materials (London: Junior Liaison Organisation of the various professional bodies including the Royal Institute of British Architects, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, etc, 1989 ).Google Scholar
  11. G. Pleydell, The Real Wood Guide ( London: Timber Trades Federation, 1990 ).Google Scholar
  12. Watts & Partners, Watts & Partners’ Hand book 1991 ( London: Watts & Partners, 1990 ).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Stuart Johnson 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Johnson

There are no affiliations available

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