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Trends in the Health of the Elderly in Western Societies

  • Kyriakos S. Markides

Abstract

One of the great revolutions of the twentieth century has been the dramatic improvement in life expectancy that has taken place in Western societies, and to a lesser extent in developing societies. In the last couple of decades, there have also been increases in the life expectancy of people already old. Particular attention has been given to improvements in the life expectancy of the very old (people 85+).

Keywords

Life Expectancy Western Society Nordic Country Health Spending Cohort Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© A. B. Atkinson and Martin Rein 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyriakos S. Markides

There are no affiliations available

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