Advertisement

Divided amongst Ourselves

  • Lorna Sage
Chapter

Abstract

Fay Weldon’s reputation as a ‘woman of letters’ is itself a measure of how our picture of such a personage has been changing, and how far niceness has fallen out of fashion. She writes in a survivalist spirit (anger, hate, bitterness, laughter taken as signs of life), and if her characters frequently moralise about ‘us’, the tone is bleak:

We shelter children for a time; we live side by side with men; and that is all. We owe them nothing, and are owed nothing. I think we owe our friends more, especially our female friends.1

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

Fay Weldon

  1. 1.
    Fay Weldon, Praxis (1978), London: Coronet, 1980, p. 163.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fay Weldon, Female Friends, London: Heinemann, 1975, p. 249.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fay Weldon, Down Among the Women (1971), Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1973, p. 83.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Fay Weldon, Remember Me (1976), London: Coronet, 1979, pp. 76–7.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    Fay Weldon, Watching Me, Watching You (1981), London: Coronet, 1982, p. 171.Google Scholar
  6. 8.
    Fay Weldon, The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1983), London: Coronet, 1984, p. 56.Google Scholar
  7. 9.
    Fay Weldon, The Cloning of Joanna May, London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1989, p. 202.Google Scholar

Margaret Atwood

  1. 1.
    Margaret Atwood, Lady Oracle (1976), London: Virago, 1982, p. 313.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (1973), London: Virago, 1977, Introduction by Francine du Plessis Grey p. 3; p. 6.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Coral Ann Howells, Private and Fictional Words, London: Methuen, 1987, p. 4; p. 55.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye, London: Bloomsbury, 1989, p. 411.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard’s Egg (1987), London: Virago, 1988, pp. 231–2.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (1973), London: Virago, 1979, p. 176.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), London: Virago, 1987, pp. 83–4.Google Scholar
  8. 9.
    Margaret Atwood, Life Before Man, London: Jonathan Cape, 1980, p. 48.Google Scholar
  9. 10.
    Margaret Atwood, Bodily Harm (1982), London; Virago 1983, p. 300.Google Scholar
  10. 11.
    Margaret Atwood, ‘An end to audience?’ in Second Words, Toronto: Annansi, 1982, pp. 334–57.Google Scholar

Angela Carter

  1. 1.
    John Berger, Ways of Seeing, London: BBC/Penguin, 1972, p. 47.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Angela Carter, The Magic Toyshop (1967), London: Virago, 1981, p. 33.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Angela Carter, Heroes and Villains (1969), Harmondsworth: King Penguin, 1982, p. 137.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Angela Carter, Love (1971), revised edition London: Chatto & Windus, 1987, p. 2.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Angela Carter, Love, London: Hart-Davis, 1971, p. 84.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Angela Carter, The Passion of New Eve, London: Gollancz, 1977, p. 75.Google Scholar
  7. 8.
    Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality (La Volonté de Savoir, Paris; Editions Gallimard, 1976), Volume One: An Introduction, tr. Robert Hurley, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981, p. 93.Google Scholar
  8. 9.
    Angela Carter, The Sadeian Woman, London: Virago, 1979, p. 11.Google Scholar
  9. 10.
    Angela Carter, ‘Notes From the Front Line’ in Gender and Writing, ed. Michelene Wandor, London: Pandora Press, 1983, pp. 69–77, p. 71, p. 76.Google Scholar
  10. 11.
    Angela Carter, The Passion of New Eve, London: Gollancz, 1977, p. 191.Google Scholar
  11. 13.
    Angela Carter, Nights at the Circus, London: Chatto & Windus, 1984, p. 25.Google Scholar
  12. 14.
    ‘On to the female body have been projected the fantasies and longings and terrors of generations of men and through them of women… a constant exchange takes place between images and reality.’ Marina Warner, Monuments and Maidens (1985), London: Picador, 1987, p. 37.Google Scholar

Toni Morrison

  1. 1.
    Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987), London: Picador, 1988, pp. 272–3.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Toni Morrison, Tar Baby (1981), London; Triad Panther, 1983, p. 166; p. 168.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Toni Morrison Song of Solomon (1977), New York: Signet/New American Library, 1978, p. 224.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Toni Morrison, Sula (1974), London: Triad Grafton, 1982, p. 78.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea (La Nausée, 1938), Harmondsworth: Penguin 1963, p. 252.Google Scholar

Joyce Carol Oates

  1. 1.
    Janice Doane and Devon Hodges, Nostalgia and Sexual Difference, London: Methuen, 1987, pp. 9–10.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Charles Newman, ‘The Post-Modern Aura’, Salmagundi, Nos 63-4, 1984, pp. 3–199, p. 99.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Joyce Carol Oates, New Heaven, New Earth, London: Gollancz, 1976, pp. 118–19.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Joyce Carol Oates, Do With Me What You Will (1973), London: Gollancz, 1974, p. 373.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Vladimir Nabokov, The Annotated Lolita, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1970, p. xxxii.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Joyce Carol Oates, The Edge of Impossibility (1972), London: Gollancz, 1976, p. 8.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Joyce Carol Oates, Childwold, London: Gollancz, 1977, p. 60.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Joyce Carol Oates, New Heaven, New Earth, London: Gollancz, 1976, pp. 126–7.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Joyce Carol Oates, Bellefleur, London: Jonathan Cape, 1981.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Joyce Carol Oates, Mysteries of Winterthurn, London: Jonathan Cape 1984, p. 25.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Lorna Sage 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorna Sage

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations