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Viewing ‘the Immense Panorama or Futility and Anarchy that is Contemporary History’ in the First Six Novels of Charles Williams

  • Marlene Mckinley

Abstract

Charles Williams wrote his first six novels during the period be­tween the two world wars, a period of great economic, political, social, and religious upheaval. At a time when other British writers, especially of the younger generation, were in flux, isolated in/by ‘the immense panorama of futility and anarchy that is contemporary history’ and trying to express that experience as well as attempting to find and establish some value, are Charles Williams’s novels merely ‘thrillers’, escape reading for the lost masses, which he dashed off quickly in order to supplement his income? Or do they, in fact, reveal more?

Keywords

Working Life Grand Rapid Sexual Prejudice Waste Land British Writer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marlene Mckinley

There are no affiliations available

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