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Workshop Seven: Experiential Learning

  • Paul Morrison
  • Philip Barnard
Chapter

Abstract

Experiential learning methods have been widely used to develop interpersonal skills in nursing. This workshop offers an introduction to the approach and outlines activities that can be used to explore the process of learning through experience.

Keywords

Action Learn Experiential Learning Student Nurse Nurse Education Theory Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Booklists for students

  1. Bailey, C.R. 1983 Experiential learning and the curriculum, Nursing Times, July 20th, 45–46.Google Scholar
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References

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Copyright information

© Paul Morrison and Philip Burnard 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Morrison
    • 1
  • Philip Barnard
    • 1
  1. 1.Nursing StudiesUniversity of Wales College of MedicineCardifUK

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