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Workshop Six: Six Category Intervention Analysis

  • Paul Morrison
  • Philip Barnard
Chapter

Abstract

Six Category Intervention Analysis (Heron, 1989) picks out six ways of responding in a therapeutic setting. This workshop helps people to discriminate between the six, identify their own strengths and weaknesses in the categories and practise the skills that they feel least competent in using.

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For students

  1. Burnard, P. 1990 Learning Human Skills: An Experiential Guide for Nurses, 2nd edition, Heinemann, Oxford.Google Scholar
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  3. Burnard, P. and Morrison, P. 1988 Nurses’ perceptions of their interpersonal skills: a descriptive study using six category intervention analysis, Nurse Education Today, 8, 266–272.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  6. Kitty, J. 1983 Experiential Learning, Human Potential Research Project, University of Surrey, Guildford.Google Scholar
  7. Morrison, P. and Burnard, P. 1989 Students’ and trained nurses’ perceptions of their own interpersonal skills: a report and comparison, Journal of Advanced Nursing, 14, 321–329.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

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Copyright information

© Paul Morrison and Philip Burnard 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Morrison
    • 1
  • Philip Barnard
    • 1
  1. 1.Nursing StudiesUniversity of Wales College of MedicineCardifUK

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