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Studies of Minds under Pressure, 1954–9

  • Vincent Piket
Part of the New Directions in American Studies book series

Abstract

In the second phase of his early career, Louis Auchincloss continued the examination of individuals in relation to an inimical environment. The theme was slightly modified, however. First, while in two of the preceding novels Auchincloss had chosen women as his main characters, during the years 1954–9 he focused on male main characters. To a certain degree, this change was only superficial: after all, Sybil Hilliard and Eloise Dilworth were to an extent androgynous characters, in whom the focus was on problems that transcended their gender. Turning to the male gender in The Great World and Timothy Colt (1956), Venus in Sparta (1958) and Pursuit of the Prodigal (1959) was therefore partly just the removal of a mask.

Keywords

Family Firm Sexual Inhibition Married Life Sexual Assertiveness Great World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 2.
    Lewis Nichols, ‘Talk with Louis Auchincloss’, New York Times Book Review, 21 Oct 1956, p. 56.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    James Stern, ‘Reflections in a Mirror’, New York Times Book Review, 16 May 1954, p. 4.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Cf. Rose Feld, ‘Chemistry of Temperament’, New York Herald Tribune Book Review, 6 June 1954, p. 4;Google Scholar
  4. Charles J. Rolo, ‘Reflection in Mirrors’, Atlantic Monthly, CXCIV (July 1954) 84.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Auchincloss, The Great World and Timothy Colt (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1956) p. 26.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    An excellent analysis of the moral and social dimension of the relationship between Colt and Knox is contained in Thomas L. Shaffer, ‘Henry Knox and the Moral Theology of Law Firms’, Washington and Lee Law Review, XXXVIII (1981) 347–75.Google Scholar
  7. 10.
    Auchincloss, Venus in Sparta (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1958) p. 28.Google Scholar
  8. 13.
    Auchincloss, Pursuit of the Prodigal (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1959) pp. 11–12.Google Scholar
  9. 14.
    Ibid., p. 12. This phrase was borrowed from the short story ‘The Interior Castle’ in Children Are Bored on Sundays (1953) by Jean Stafford, whose work Auchincloss knew and admired.Google Scholar
  10. 2.
    Lewis Nichols, ‘Talk with Louis Auchincloss’, New York Times Book Review, 21 Oct 1956, p. 56.Google Scholar
  11. 3.
    James Stern, ‘Reflections in a Mirror’, New York Times Book Review, 16 May 1954, p. 4.Google Scholar
  12. 4.
    Cf. Rose Feld, ‘Chemistry of Temperament’, New York Herald Tribune Book Review, 6 June 1954, p. 4;Google Scholar
  13. Charles J. Rolo, ‘Reflection in Mirrors’, Atlantic Monthly, CXCIV (July 1954) 84.Google Scholar
  14. 5.
    Auchincloss, The Great World and Timothy Colt (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1956) p. 26.Google Scholar
  15. 7.
    An excellent analysis of the moral and social dimension of the relationship between Colt and Knox is contained in Thomas L. Shaffer, ‘Henry Knox and the Moral Theology of Law Firms’, Washington and Lee Law Review, XXXVIII (1981) 347–75.Google Scholar
  16. 10.
    Auchincloss, Venus in Sparta (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1958) p. 28.Google Scholar
  17. 13.
    Auchincloss, Pursuit of the Prodigal (Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 1959) pp. 11–12.Google Scholar
  18. 14.
    Ibid., p. 12. This phrase was borrowed from the short story ‘The Interior Castle’ in Children Are Bored on Sundays (1953) by Jean Stafford, whose work Auchincloss knew and admired.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Vincent Piket 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent Piket

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