Egypt’s Intervention in Yemen (1963–1964)

  • Alan James
Part of the Studies in International Security book series (SIS)

Abstract

In September 1962 the traditional royalist regime in Yemen was overturned by republicans, but incompletely so. A civil war thereupon developed, which had threatening international links. For neighbouring Saudi Arabia was a source of both official and unofficial support for the royalists, whereas Egypt (then officially known as the United Arab Republic, UAR) immediately extended both diplomatic and military succour to the republicans. This involvement of the leading conservative and progressive states in the Arab world could conceivably have had even wider repercussions, as Saudi Arabia and Egypt were closely connected to the United States and the Soviet Union respectively. However, the United States, besides wanting to restore stability in this oil-rich part of the world, was at this time anxious to build up her standing in the eyes of the non-monarchical Arab regimes. She therefore bent her efforts in the direction of a dampening of the conflict at this troublesome Arab crossroads. The UN Secretary-General was also working towards that goal.

Keywords

Egypt Yemen 

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Further Reading

  1. Winston Burdett, Encounter with the Middle East (London: Deutsch, 1970).Google Scholar
  2. Carl von Horn, Soldiering for Peace (London: Cassell, 1966).Google Scholar
  3. Christopher J. McMullen, Resolution of the Yemen Crisis, 1963 (Washington, DC: Georgetown University, 1980).Google Scholar
  4. Dana Schmidt, ‘The Civil War in Yemen’, in Evan Luard (ed.), The International Regulation of Civil Wars (London: Thames and Hudson, 1972).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Institute for Strategic Studies 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan James
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KeeleUK

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