Piracy and Terrorism at Sea

  • James Cable

Abstract

Anyone contemplating a voyage by sea may have good reason to prefer the vigorous view of the law stated in 1817 by Lord Stowell to the permissiveness recorded in 1984 by Professor O’Connell. There are today so many groups or gangs claiming political motives for the crimes they commit against inoffensive travellers that the exemption of insurgents from the penalties of piracy can only be deplored.

Keywords

Steam Syria Expense Liner Hunt 

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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    Quoted in D. P. O’Connell, The International Law of the Sea, Vol. II (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1984), p. 967.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    See Barry H. Dubner, The Law of International Sea Piracy (The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff, 1980), pp. 147–9, andGoogle Scholar
  3. P. W. Birnie, ‘Piracy: past, present and future’, Marine Policy, July 1987.Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Edward F. Mickolus, Transnational Terrorism: A Chronology of Events 1968–1979 (London, Aldwych Press, 1980), p. 164.Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    See Note 5 and Rainer Osterwalder, ‘Rescue in the South China Sea’, Swiss Review of World Affairs, January 1988.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    The Times 11 and 14 February 1986; Scott C. Turner, ‘Maritime Terrorism 1985’, United States Naval Institute Proceedings May 1986.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Captain Donald Macintyre, The Privateers, London, Paul Elek, 1975, p. 184.Google Scholar
  8. 15.
    Hugh Thomas, The Spanish Civil War (London, Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1961), p. 477.Google Scholar
  9. 16.
    US Department of State, ‘Patterns of Global Terrorism 1984’ Terrorism, Vol. 9, No. 4, 1987.Google Scholar
  10. 17.
    Jan S. Breemer, ‘Offshore Energy Terrorism’, Terrorism, Vol. 6, No. 3, 1983.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sir James Cable 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Cable

There are no affiliations available

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