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Rural Employment Linkages through Agricultural Growth: Concepts, Issues, and Questions

  • John W. Mellor
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Contemporary development theory has had little place for agriculture in growth. This is because of a perceived weakness of backward and forward linkages (in Hirschman’s, 1958, strong condemnation of agriculture on this count, for example); or, because of an emphasis on capital formation as the primary engine of growth, with agriculture as a consumer goods industry with low savings rates (e.g., see Mahalanobis, 1953 — he was the father of the Indian Second Five Year Plan); or, because of an emphasis on import substitution, with agriculture seen as an export industry, as a producer of nontradable output, or with both inelastic demand and supply (e.g., see Prebisch, 1971).

Keywords

Technological Change Saving Rate Wage Bill Effective Demand Agricultural Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Mellor
    • 1
  1. 1.International Food Policy Research InstituteUSA

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