Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and Mao’s Cultural Revolution

  • F. Quei Quo

Abstract

Referring to Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Pierre Ryckmans, author of Chinese Shadows, stated that:

Without even dreaming of Mao’s China, Orwell succeeded in describing it, down to concrete details of daily life, with more truth and accuracy than most researchers who came back from Peking to tell us ‘the real truth’.1

Keywords

Coherence Oilfield Folk Lism Hate 

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Notes and References

  1. 4.
    Simon Leys (Pierre Ryckmans) Chinese Shadows (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974), p. 52, note 8.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    For example, see Roger Garside, Coming Alive: China After Mao (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1981). Also see Robert C. Tucker, ‘Does Big Brother Really Exist?’, Psychoanalytic Inquiry, ii, i (1982).Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Liang Heng and Judith Shapiro, Son of the Revolution (New York: Knopf, 1983). According to Liang: ‘One of my classmates rejected his old name, Wen Jian-ping (“Wen Establish Peace”) in favour of Wen Zao-fan (“Wen Rebel”). My neighbor Li Lin (“Lin Forest”) called herself Li Zi-hone (“Li Red from Birth”) to advertise her good background. Zao Cai-fa (“Zao Make Money”) became Zhao Wei-dong (“Zhao Protect the East”). Another friend got rid of the “Chiang” in his name because it was the same as Chiang Kai-sheck’s’ (p. 69).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Asian Research Centre, The Great Cultural Revolution in China (Hong Kong: Charles E. Tuttle, 1968), pp. 453–90.Google Scholar
  5. 18.
    D. W. Fokkema, Report from Peking (Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 1971), p. 163.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Peter Buitenhuis and Ira B. Nadel 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Quei Quo

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