Advertisement

Abstract

In the press, this was Mrs Thatcher’s election. Not just because 7 out of 11 national daily newspapers supported her re-election; that was predictable and the endorsements were less fulsome than in 1983. The Prime Minister’s triumph lay in the way her government’s Industrial Relations Act had been exploited by newspaper proprietors since the last election to bring about a revolution in the production and distribution of their titles. In a perfect cameo of the enterprise culture, aggressive entrepreneurs had introduced new(ish) technology over the heads of reluctant trade unions. One immediate consequence was that by the time of the election most national papers had firm plans to move out of Fleet Street if indeed they had not already done so. It was the end of the Street.1

Keywords

Labour Party Conservative Party Daily Mail Daily Telegraph Conservative Paper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    L. Melvern, The End of the Street (London, 1986).Google Scholar
  2. M. Hollingsworth, The Press and Political Dissent (London, 1986).Google Scholar
  3. M. Cockerell, P. Hennessy and D. Walker, Sources Close to the Prime Minister (London, 1985).Google Scholar
  4. A. Hetherington, News, Newspapers and Television (Basingstoke, 1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. S. Jenkins, Market for Glory: Fleet Street Ownership in the Twentieth Century (London, 1986).Google Scholar
  6. H. Porter, Lies, Damned Lies and Some Exclusives (London, 1984).Google Scholar
  7. 2.
    D. Goodhart and P. Wintour, Eddie Shah and the Newspaper Revolution (London, 1986).Google Scholar
  8. 4.
    M. Harrop, ‘The Press and Post-war Elections’, in Political Communications: the 1983 Election Campaign, I. Crewe and M. Harrop (eds) (Cambridge, 1986), pp. 137–49.Google Scholar
  9. see B. MacArthur, ‘The Press and Its Politics’, Sunday Times, 23 August 1987, p. 41.Google Scholar
  10. 6.
    R. Worcester, ‘Trying the Food on the Dog’, New Statesman, 24 July 1987, pp. 12–13.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© David Butler and Dennis Kavanagh 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Harrop

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations