Wetland Conservation: Economics and Ethics

  • R. Kerry Turner

Abstract

Richard Lecomber (1975, 1978) was one of a number of writers who have questioned the unidimensional economic efficiency approach to welfare measurement and economic growth so characteristic of the conventional (essentially neoclassical) economic doctrine. He supported the argument that welfare is a multidimensional concept which encompasses, among other variables, per capita gross domestic product, distributional equity and environmental quality. Social welfare (economic plus non-economic welfare) is, in principle, better represented by a vector profile and not a scalar. Nevertheless, in the absence of an unambiguous measure for welfare, the integration of environmental criteria (often unpriced) into the conventional planning and decision-making processes has proved to be a somewhat intractable politico-economic problem.

Keywords

Biomass Clay Income Acid Sulphate Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© David Collard, David Pearce, and David Ulph 1988

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  • R. Kerry Turner

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