The Conclusion of the Crimean Campaign and the War on other Fronts

  • J. B. Conacher

Abstract

Despite the prolonged bombardment and heavy fighting the Allies seemed no closer to taking Sebastopol when Lord Raglan died at the end of June than they had been when the spring offensive opened early in April. As we have seen when Palmerston came into office he and Panmure rebuked Raglan but did not replace him Now they had to do so. Therefore, in this chapter we must consider the continuing problem of the leadership of the British Army in the Crimea, as well as the completion of the campaign of 1855 in that theatre of war, the second winter and the planning for 1856, and, more briefly, the war on the other fronts and the Anglo-American enlistment crisis.

Keywords

Shipping Assure Turkey Expense Trench 

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Notes

  1. 67.
    See D. Bonner-Smith (ed.) Russian War, 1855, Baltic: Official Correspondence; Annual Register, 1855, 223–30; Curtiss, Russia’s Crimean War, 283–9;Google Scholar
  2. Carl C. Revells, An Eye on Sevastopol: British Naval Policy and Operations during the Russian War, 1853–1856, Queen’s University doctoral thesis 1984.Google Scholar
  3. 74.
    See R. A. Humphreys, The Diplomacy of British Honduras 1638–1901 and my ‘Lessons in Twisting the Lion’s Tail’, in Michael Cross and Robert Bothwell (eds), Policy by Other Means: Essays in Honour of C. P. Stacey, 77–94 (from which the quotations are taken). In what follows I wish to acknowledge some useful leads given me by a former graduate student, D. R. Thompson, who wrote a research paper for me on the Enlistment Crisis many years ago.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© J. B. Conacher 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Conacher
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoCanada

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