Breaking the mould: a brief encounter with the sociology of leisure

  • John Clarke
  • Chas Critcher
Chapter
Part of the Titles in the Crisis Points series book series (CRPOI)

Abstract

For though abstract discussions about theoretical premises have a limited value, it matters very much, in history as in other social sciences, what starting points are chosen. (Richard Johnson, ‘Culture and the Historians’, in J. Clarke, C. Critcher and R. Johnson (eds), Working Class Culture, Hutchinson. 1979, p. 41.)

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Further reading

  1. British working class community studies are well represented by N. Dennis, F. Henriques and C. Slaughter, Coal is Our Life (Tavistock, 1969)Google Scholar
  2. B. Jackson. Working Class Community (Routledge & Kegan Paul. 1968)Google Scholar
  3. K. Coates and R. Silburn, Poverty: the Forgotten Englishmen (Penguin. 1970). The tradition of cultural criticism focused on leisure in R. Hoggart. The Uses of Literacy (Penguin, 1958) and R. Williams, Culture and Society (Penguin, 1962). For an evaluation of these two traditions see C. Critcher,’ sociology, cultural studies and the post-war working class’, in J. Clarke, C. Critcher and R. Johnson (eds), Working Class Culture (Hutchinson, 1979).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Clarke and Chas Critcher 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Clarke
  • Chas Critcher

There are no affiliations available

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