Leadership and Supervision

  • Mike Smith
  • John Beck
  • Cary L. Cooper
  • Charles Cox
  • Dick Ottaway
  • Reg Talbot

Abstract

They had something to celebrate, so it was quite a party. A small research team in the North-west had upstaged Silicon Valley and had given their company a competitive advantage with their refinement of the lazer zapping of silicon chips. They were also drinking to build up their Dutch courage, because they were about to endure a congratulation speech from a headquarter’s executive. The speech took its predictable course: perfunctory appreciation; an acknowledgement of their position among the world leaders in lazer zapping; an acknowledgement of the lead they had shown to other research teams within the company. The executive knew little about the technicalities of lazer zapping but he considered himself an expert on the subject of leadership — the country needs more strong leaders … leaders are born not made … leaders must inspire awe in their followers … a leader must ruthlessly rivet everyone’s attention on the strategy and objectives which he has identified.

Keywords

Tated Dick Lewin Preconceive 

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Copyright information

© Mike Smith, John Beck, Cary L. Cooper, Charles Cox, Dick Ottaway and Reg Talbot 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Smith
    • 1
  • John Beck
    • 1
  • Cary L. Cooper
    • 1
  • Charles Cox
    • 1
  • Dick Ottaway
    • 1
  • Reg Talbot
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Management SciencesUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and TechnologyUK

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