The Manager and His Job

  • Mike Smith
  • John Beck
  • Cary L. Cooper
  • Charles Cox
  • Dick Ottaway
  • Reg Talbot

Abstract

In essence, management is concerned with the efficient use of the three Ms — Men, Money and Materials. Each of these three ingredients is an essential part of the work activity of a manager, whether he is producing silicon chips, optical fibres or cotton T-shirts. The same three Ms — Men, Money and Materials — are also involved in the work of managers in service industries as widely different as merchant banking, hospital management or publishing. In all these settings, managers are concerned with the efficient use of resources so that the services and goods leaving their organizations are worth more than the resources which their organization consumes.

Keywords

Europe Income Syria Egypt Argentina 

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Copyright information

© Mike Smith, John Beck, Cary L. Cooper, Charles Cox, Dick Ottaway and Reg Talbot 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Smith
    • 1
  • John Beck
    • 1
  • Cary L. Cooper
    • 1
  • Charles Cox
    • 1
  • Dick Ottaway
    • 1
  • Reg Talbot
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Management SciencesUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and TechnologyUK

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