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Additional Areas in Organizational Behaviour

  • Mike Smith
  • John Beck
  • Cary L. Cooper
  • Charles Cox
  • Dick Ottaway
  • Reg Talbot

Abstract

The material covered in this book clearly shows the variety involved in studying organizations. At one level we are talking about an individual manager, the job he has to do, his motives, the way he learns and his personality. At another level, we are talking about the way individuals function in work-groups, how they judge each other, how they communicate and how they work together. At a third level we are talking about the organization and how it changes. Yet even this array does not reveal the full range of topics that lie within the domain of organizational behaviour. The normal constraints inherent in any book that seeks to introduce a subject have meant that only a selection of topics could be covered while equally fascinating material has to be omitted.

Keywords

Organizational Behaviour Organizational Climate Additional Area Organizational Psychology Meeting Production Target 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References for Chapter 14

  1. Barrett, G. V. and Bass, B. M. (1976) ‘Comparative Surveys of Managerial Attitudes and Behavior’,in Boddewyn, J. (ed.), Comparative Management and Teaching, Training and Research, Graduate School of Business Administration, New York University, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Bass, B. M. (1967) ‘Use of Exercises for Management and Organizational Psychology’, Training and Development Journal, 21(4), 2–7.Google Scholar
  3. Bonchard, T. J. (1976) ‘Field Research Methods’, In Dunnette, M. D. (ed.), Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Rand McNally, Chicago.Google Scholar
  4. Cook, T. D. and Campbell, D. T. (1976) ‘The Design and Conduct of Quasi-experiments and the Experiments in Field Settings’, in Dunnette, M. D. (ed.), Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Rand McNally, Chicago.Google Scholar
  5. Kagitcibasi, C. (1970) ‘Social Norms and Authoritarianism: A Turkish-American Comparison’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 16, 444–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Litwin, G. H. and Stringer, R. A. (1968) Motivation and Organizational Climate, Graduate School of Business, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.Google Scholar
  7. Pugh, D. S. and Hickson, D.J. (1976) Organizational Structure in its Context, Saxon House, Farnborough, England.Google Scholar
  8. Schaninger, M., Barrett, G. V. and Alexander, R. A. (1973) National Organizational and Individual Correlates of Simulated Decision Making, Technical Report 65, ONR Contract N00014–167, University of Rochester Management Centre, Rochester.Google Scholar
  9. Williams, L. K. et al. (1966) ‘Do Cultural Differences Affect Workers’ Attitudes’, Industrial Relations, 5, 110–17.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Mike Smith, John Beck, Cary L. Cooper, Charles Cox, Dick Ottaway and Reg Talbot 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Smith
    • 1
  • John Beck
    • 1
  • Cary L. Cooper
    • 1
  • Charles Cox
    • 1
  • Dick Ottaway
    • 1
  • Reg Talbot
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Management SciencesUniversity of Manchester Institute of Science and TechnologyUK

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