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Society’s Cradle: An Anthropological Perspective on the Socialisation of Cognition

  • Billie Jean Isbell
  • Lauris McKee
Chapter

Abstract

As a species, we have universal capacities for perceiving the world, and cognitively structuring what we perceive. Nonetheless, the stimuli available to perception and the cultural values which give meaning to the objects and events perceived determine that cognitive skills may covary in some manner with the meaningful stimuli available to perception.

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Copyright information

© The contributors 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Billie Jean Isbell
    • 1
  • Lauris McKee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyCornell UniversityMcGraw Hall, IthacaUSA

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