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Promoting School Adjustment

Chapter
Part of the National Children’s Bureau series book series (NCB)

Abstract

Disruptive behaviour, truancy and the like, especially in secondary schools, are perhaps some of the most worrying aspects of the current educational scene and, because of their association with delinquency, vandalism and with the ‘Great Debate’ about educational standards, this concern is widely shared. However, there is much uncertainty and confusion not only about the extent and nature of the problems but also about what, if anything, can be done to deal with, or to prevent, such behaviour.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© National Children’s Bureau 1980

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