Bills of Quantities by Computer

  • R. J. Alvey
Chapter
Part of the Building and Surveying Series book series

Abstract

At this juncture the effect of computerisation on the work of the quantity surveyor will be considered. A large proportion of the quantity surveyor’s work is a tedious manual routine involving the speedy calculation and collation of items. Since the computer is very adept at performing these routines at a phenomenal speed the quantity surveyor should be attracted by this facility.

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References

  1. 1.
    The DG System: Computer Techniques Billing Systems (Development Group of Chartered Quantity Surveyors, R.I.C.S., London, 1973).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Computer Techniques (Research and Information Group of the Quantity Surveyors’ Committee of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, R.I.C.S., London).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    T. F. FryComputer Appreciation (Butterworth, London, 1970).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. F. FryComputer System Handbook Part 1M, Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme: Central Development Group.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    T. F. FryComputer System Handbook Part 2M, Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme: Central Development Group.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    T. F. FryComputer System General Introduction Local Authorities Management Services and Computer Committee: Steering and Development Group.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    R. Swanston, `CLASP Computer System’, Chart. Surv., 102 (1970) pp. 411–16.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    K. W. Monk and T. D. Dunstone, `Short Coding in Practical Surveying by Computer’, Chart. Surv., 99 (1967) pp. 420–2.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© R. J. Alvey 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Alvey
    • 1
  1. 1.Trent PolytechnicUK

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