Aesthetics: pp 193-218 | Cite as

The Scope of Aesthetics

  • Ruth L. Saw
Chapter
Part of the Modern Introductions to Philosophy book series (MIP)

Abstract

In my early days of teaching, “Introduction” as used to describe elementary treatments of studies in books or in university courses seemed to me a much misused term. I began my teaching life in a very good American college, yet it seemed to me that all the “introductory courses” listed in the prospectus introduced the students to nothing. They were eager to learn and took introductory courses in mathematics, music, zoology, logic, in everything you can think of, and probably then went on to something quite different. This bothered me. Now, however, the matter presents itself to me differently. An introduction is essentially a presenting of a person or thing to give one the opportunity of following up the introduction or not. We introduce a person by indicating her and saying, “This is my sister.” There she is to be presented, and you may decide that you would like to know her better. A study cannot be presented in quite this way; we cannot say, “This is aesthetics, there it is.”

Keywords

Arsenic Brittleness Assure Lost Verse 

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Copyright information

© Ruth L. Saw 1972

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  • Ruth L. Saw

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