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The Role of the Tertiary Sector in the Economic Development of Switzerland

  • Jean Valarché
Chapter
  • 31 Downloads
Part of the International Economic Association Conference Volumes, Numbers 1–50 book series (IEA)

Abstract

In Switzerland the tertiary sector possesses the same features as the secondary sector:
  1. (1)

    Firstly, a large degree of economic concentration offsets the geographical dispersion of the country. Banking and commercial establishments are numerous but most of the business of the country is conducted by the large organisations (five large banks, a union of consumption co-operatives and a Federation of MIGROS Cooperatives).

     
  2. (2)

    Secondly, the sphere of business activity goes beyond the national border. Switzerland is the world’sleading exporter of reinsurance policies; Swiss bankers work on an international scale; her transport industry represents a quarter of her world traffic in goods.2

     

Keywords

Swiss Franc Domestic Service Tertiary Sector External Economy Secondary Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. (1) Firstly, a large degree of economic concentration offsets the geographical dispersion of the country. Banking and commercial establishments are numerous but most of the business of the country is conducted by the large organisations (five large banks, a union of consumption co-operatives and a Federation of MIGROS Cooperatives).Google Scholar
  2. (2) Secondly, the sphere of business activity goes beyond the national border. Switzerland is the world’sleading exporter of reinsurance policies; Swiss bankers work on an international scale; her transport industry represents a quarter of her world traffic in goods.2Google Scholar
  3. V. J. P. Baumgarten, ‘The Transport Industry’, Swiss Review of Politics and Statistics (1964) nos. 1–2.Google Scholar
  4. V. R. Zollinger, ‘On the Structure of Population and Society’, Swiss Review, nos. 1–2 (1964).Google Scholar
  5. From ‘From the Industrial Economy to the Service Economy’, The O.E.C.D. Observer (Feb 1967).Google Scholar
  6. ‘The Member Countries of the O.E.C.D.’, The O.E.C.D. Observer (Feb 1967).Google Scholar
  7. C. Clark, The Conditions of Economic Progress, French translation, p. 311Google Scholar
  8. Les 40,000 heures, p. 44.Google Scholar
  9. Connections between sectors of commerce are weak. The relationship between purchases made by various sectors and total production — 16%. The relationship between sales made by sectors to total demand — 17%. Calculations by Chenery and Watanabe, ‘International Comparisons of the Structure of Production’.Google Scholar
  10. ‘The Role of Education in Economic Development’ — in Planning Education for Economic and Social Development: Mediterranean Regional Project, O.E.C.D., 1962, p. 41.Google Scholar
  11. The relationship between the number of Swiss students and the number of Swiss aged between 20 and 27.Google Scholar
  12. Dangibeaud, L’ Assurance et la croissance économique.Google Scholar
  13. The Conditions of Economic Progress, pp. 38–45.Google Scholar
  14. The Future of Tourism in the Pacific and the Far East, Washington, 1961.Google Scholar
  15. ‘The Member Countries of the O.E.C.D.’ in The O.E.C.D. Observer (Feb 1967). 2 R. Deonna, New Memorandum of the Swiss Economy, p. 131.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Valarché
    • 1
  1. 1.University of FribourgSwitzerland

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