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The Backward Region of Fribourg in Switzerland

  • Jean Valarché
Chapter
  • 31 Downloads
Part of the International Economic Association Conference Volumes, Numbers 1–50 book series (IEA)

Abstract

Switzerland has one of the most highly developed economies in the world, but there are appreciable differences in the level of development as between one canton and another. This may seem astonishing in so small a country; the explanation lies in natural and human divisions. Factors of production do not easily move between cantons, and there is no large-scale federal expenditure to equalise opportunities between unequally well-endowed regions. Yet a poor canton does not compare with a rich canton in the same terms that a depressed area compares with an advanced one, and this is one reason why the case of backward regions in Switzerland is of special interest.

Keywords

Economic Expansion Equalisation Payment Agricultural Income Swiss Plateau Mountain Pasture 
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Notes

  1. The Backward Region of Fribourg in Switzerland1 Google Scholar
  2. Switzerland has one of the most highly developed economies in the world, but there are appreciable differences in the level of development as between one canton and another. This may seem astonishing in so small a country; the explanation lies in natural and human divisions. Factors of production do not easily move between cantons, and there is no large-scale federal expenditure to equalise opportunities between unequally well-endowed regions. Yet a poor canton does not compare with a rich canton in the same terms that a depressed area compares with an advanced one, and this is one reason why the case of backward regions in Switzerland is of special interest.Google Scholar
  3. See J. Valarché, ‘Le Problème de la parité des revenus’, Rivista internazionale di scienze economiche e commerciali no. 11 (1963).Google Scholar
  4. Federal population census, 1963.Google Scholar
  5. See H. B. Chenery and T. Watanabe, ‘International Comparisons of the Structure of Production’, Econometrica, Oct 1958.Google Scholar
  6. It is difficult to know what a top-ranking employee actually earns, but definitely a good deal less in Fribourg than he could earn elsewhere in Switzerland for the same job. Civil service salaries may be taken as an example. A university professor in Fribourg earns 15% less than the Swiss average.Google Scholar
  7. According to the Swiss Tourist Federation, 3 1/2 is the multiplier for the tourist industry.Google Scholar
  8. J. Valarché, ‘Innovation in Stock Farming: Information Flow from the Agricultural and Animal Food Industries’. Paper prepared for the International Economic Association’sConference on Economic Problems of Agriculture in Industrial Societies and Repercussions in Developing Countries, Rome, 1–8 September 1965.Google Scholar
  9. R. Livet, L’Avenir des régions agricoles, Ed. Économie et Humanisme (Paris 1965) p. 28.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Valarché
    • 1
  1. 1.University of FribourgSwitzerland

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