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Some Old and New Issues in Regional Development

  • Edgar M. Hoover
Chapter
Part of the International Economic Association Conference Volumes, Numbers 1–50 book series (IEA)

Abstract

I am only too painfully aware of being probably the only participant in this conference who is innocent of any experience in actually diagnosing and prescribing for the problem of a backward area in an advanced country. Under the circumstances, it seems most fitting that I try to contribute by offering the impressions of an interested observer on some of the controversy on relevant development theory and policy in recent years. I shall attempt, then, to put into focus what seem to me the most important issues at stake, and to relate them to each other. Little if any of this will be news to members of the conference, but I may succeed in making some sufficiently provocative statements to provide a basis for constructive discussion by the real experts. I shall also have occasion, towards the end of this paper, to propose some fruitful lines of further inquiry.

Keywords

Regional Development Advanced Country Growth Centre Forward Linkage External Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. I am only too painfully aware of being probably the only participant in this conference who is innocent of any experience in actually diagnosing and prescribing for the problem of a backward area in an advanced country. Under the circumstances, it seems most fitting that I try to contribute by offering the impressions of an interested observer on some of the controversy on relevant development theory and policy in recent years. I shall attempt, then, to put into focus what seem to me the most important issues at stake, and to relate them to each other. Little if any of this will be news to members of the conference, but I may succeed in making some sufficiently provocative statements to provide a basis for constructive discussion by the real experts. I shall also have occasion, towards the end of this paper, to propose some fruitful lines of further inquiry.Google Scholar
  2. E. M. Hoover, The Location of Economic Activity (McGraw-Hill, N.Y., 1948) p. 242Google Scholar
  3. The non-white population is now more urban than the white population.Google Scholar
  4. Louis Winnick, ‘Place Prosperity v. People Prosperity: Welfare Consideration in the Geographic Distribution of Economic Activity’, in Essays in Urban Land Economics (in honour of the 65th birthday of Leo Grebler), Real Estate Research Program, University of California at Los Angeles, 1966.Google Scholar
  5. Allan R. Pred, The Spatial Dynamics of U.S. Urban-Industrial Growth, 1800–1914 (Cambridge, Mass. and London: The M.I.T. Press, 1966).Google Scholar
  6. Cf. Everett S. Lee, ‘A Theory of Migration’, Demography, vol. 3, (1966) no. 1, pp. 47–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ira S. Lowry, Migration and Metropolitan Growth: Two Analytical Models (Chandler Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1966).Google Scholar
  8. Ralph R. Widner, ‘Experiment in Appalachia’, Pittsburgh Business Review, vol. 37 no. 3 (Mar 1967) p. 14.Google Scholar
  9. John Friedmann, ‘Poor Regions and Poor Nations: Perspectives on the Problem of Appalachia’, Southern Economic Journal, vol. XXXII, no. 4 (Apr 1966) p. 472.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edgar M. Hoover
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PittsburghUSA

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