The Carter Administration, 1977–81

  • Christopher Brady
Part of the Contemporary History in Context book series (CHIC)

Abstract

Jimmy Carter entered office with high expectations of significantly changing US foreign policy-making. He was committed, at least rhetorically, to a foreign policy which reflected and promoted America’s domestic values. Given such a predisposition towards human rights issues it might have been reasonable to assume that Cambodia would be high on his agenda for action. It was also reasonable to assume that when President Carter made his inaugural address he believed it would be possible to sustain his ideals in the face of the challenges he would undoubtedly encounter. Inevitably inaugurals are only ever a very basic statement of United States foreign policy but they do provide at least a guide to the ambitions of the administration, to the reality in which they intend to operate, and Carter had chosen a particularly perilous reality.

Keywords

Europe American Idealism Marketing Tated Arena 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Christopher Brady 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Brady
    • 1
  1. 1.City University Business SchoolLondonUK

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