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Prime Minister and Cabinet

  • Bill Coxall
  • Lynton Robins
  • Robert Leach
Chapter

Abstract

The powers of the state are conventionally classified as executive, legislative and judicial, which can be related in many countries to distinctive institutions, whose functions are kept separate. In Britain there is no clear separation of powers, particularly between the executive and the legislature. Moreover, even the definition of the executive in Britain is somewhat problematic.

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Further reading

  1. On the prime minister, the main source is now Hennessy (2000). Dennis Kavanagh and Peter Riddell provide thoughtful complementary analyses of Blair as prime minister in Anthony Seldon’s The Blair Effect (2001). Older useful sources include King (1985), Jones (1990) and Foley (1993). A brief updated summary of the continuing debate on ‘prime ministerial government’ is provided by Neil McNaughton in Talking Politics (2002). On the Cabinet and the central executive generally see Rhodes and Dunleavy (1995), Burch and Holliday (1996), and Smith (1999). Useful brief discussions can be found in Smith (in Holliday et al., 1999), and particularly for developments since the 2001 election, the chapters by Martin Smith and Patrick Dunleavy in Developments in British Politics 7 (Dunleavy et al., 2003).Google Scholar

Websites

  1. 10.
    10 Downing Street: <www.number-10.gov.uk>/ Cabinet Office: <www.cabinet-office.gov.uk/> Office of the Deputy Prime Minister: <www.odpm.gov.uk/>

Copyright information

© Bill Coxall, Lynton Robins and Robert Leach 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bill Coxall
  • Lynton Robins
  • Robert Leach

There are no affiliations available

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