Feed Forward Compensation Schemes for Machine Systems Based on Energy Transfer

  • Y. Koo
  • N. Leighton
  • C. Morgan
  • L. Smelov
Chapter

Summary

Electromechanical servo drives are increasingly gaining a wide range of industrial applications. One of the common configuration of such servo drives is a directly driven linkage system, for instance a four bar system. Such linkage based systems normally exhibit varying system inertia. Control strategies based on the fixed inertia terms cannot achieve a satisfactory performance in terms of speed and accuracy. The use of varying inertia terms in the control strategies design becomes paramount As a direct consequence of the varying system inertia, there are significant and undesirable internal energy transfer effects. In this paper, a semi-feed forward compensation scheme is addressed to specifically eliminate the internal energy transfer effects. The results obtained from both simulation and test-rig implementation show that the compensation scheme improves the overall system performance significantly.

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Copyright information

© Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Koo
    • 1
  • N. Leighton
    • 1
  • C. Morgan
    • 1
  • L. Smelov
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WolverhamptonUK

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