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Issues and Difficulties Associated with Quality Management Techniques and Tools: Implications for Education and Training

  • R. E. McQuater
  • M. Wilcox
  • B. G. Dale
  • R. J. Boaden
Chapter

Summary

Quality Management Techniques and Tools are used with varying degrees of success in manufacturing industries. Empirical evidence suggests that many of the difficulties arise from misdirected training, with organisations failing consider their needs, as well as those of the trainers and of the individual. Failure to do so may be one of the reasons encountered in sustaining Total Quality Management or any other manufacturing strategy or initiative. Once all needs are assessed, this paper advocates training should be specific, targeted and implemented when the need arises, rather than the nonspecific “sheep dipping” that generally takes place

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Copyright information

© Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. McQuater
    • 1
  • M. Wilcox
    • 1
  • B. G. Dale
    • 1
  • R. J. Boaden
    • 1
  1. 1.Manchester School of ManagementUMISTUK

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