The External Elements

  • Jonathan Herring
  • Marise Cremona
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Law Masters book series (PMLM)

Abstract

We must now examine some of the characteristics of the basic building blocks that make up the hundreds of different criminal offences. These underlying principles reveal a coherence in the criminal law, which makes it easier to analyse and understand particular offences.

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Bibliography and Further Reading

  1. Ashworth: The Scope of Criminal Liability for Omissions, (1989) 105 Law Quarterly Review, 424.Google Scholar
  2. Budd and Lynch: Voluntariness, Causation and Strict Liability, [1978] Criminal Law Review, 74.Google Scholar
  3. Horder: Pleading Involuntary Lack of Capacity, (1993) Cambridge Law Journal, 298.Google Scholar
  4. Lanham: Larsonneur Revisited, (1976) Criminal Law Review, 276.Google Scholar
  5. Meade: Contracting into Crime: A Theory of Criminal Omissions, (1991) Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, 147.Google Scholar
  6. Moore, Act and Crime (1993, Oxford University Press).Google Scholar
  7. Patient: Voluntariness in Offences of Absolute Liability, (1968) Criminal Law Review, 23.Google Scholar
  8. Robinson: Should the Criminal Law Abandon the Actus Reus/Mens Rea Distinction? in Shute, Gardner and Horder (eds), Action and Value in Criminal Law (1993, Oxford University Press).Google Scholar
  9. Smith J: Comment on Miller, [1982] Criminal Law Review, 526.Google Scholar
  10. Smith J: Liability for Omissions in the Criminal Law, [1984] Legal Studies, 88.Google Scholar
  11. Williams G: Criminal Omissions the Conventional View, (1991) 107 Law Quarterly Review, 432.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Marise Cremona and Jonathan Herring 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Herring
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marise Cremona
    • 3
  1. 1.University of CambridgeNew HallUK
  2. 2.Selwyn CollegeCambridgeUK
  3. 3.European Commercial Law Unit, Centre for Commercial Law Studies, Queen Mary and Westfield CollegeUniversity of LondonUK

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