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Continentalizing the North American Auto Industry

  • Lorraine Eden
  • Maureen Appel Molot

Abstract

The automobile industry (defined here as autos and auto parts) is of enormous importance to the economies of Canada, the United States, and Mexico. In each of these countries it employs a significant number of people directly and, through its linkages with suppliers and buyers, another large percentage indirectly. The economic viability of the auto industry has a direct impact on the overall health of each of the three North American economies. Predicted substantial excess capacity and large numbers of plant closures over the next ten years threaten this economic health.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment North American Free Trade Agreement Auto Industry Lean Production Content Requirement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ricardo Grinspun and Maxwell A. Cameron 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorraine Eden
  • Maureen Appel Molot

There are no affiliations available

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