Safer motherhood — a midwifery challenge

  • Mary Kensington
Chapter
Part of the Midwifery Practice book series

Abstract

A Maternal Death is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and the site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes (WHO 1979).

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Suggested further reading

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Copyright information

© Mary Kensington 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Kensington

There are no affiliations available

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