Capital Taxation, Housing Investment and Wealth Accumulation in a Small Open Economy

  • Søren Bo Nielsen
  • Peter Birch Sørensen
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

With few exceptions, the literature on international economics tends to suppress the role of the housing market and markets for durables per se in the macroeconomy. Similarly, macro-oriented studies of the housing market have nearly always been carried out in a closed economy context. As a whole, the total literature dealing with housing seems to be overwhelmingly occupied with the more micro-economic facets of parts of the housing market, as witnessed by the useful survey by Smith et al. (1988).

Keywords

Income Assure Resi 

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Søren Bo Nielsen
    • 1
  • Peter Birch Sørensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Copenhagen Business SchoolDenmark

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