Competition pp 37-68 | Cite as

Competitive Positioning

  • Emilio Cvitkovic

Abstract

The quotations above are as close as we can get to an intellectual ‘mano a mano’ between philosophers from different centuries. Woody Allen might be more entertaining, but Machiavelli is probably more accurate. About half of the success of a company is tied to the fate of the industry in which it operates.

Keywords

Europe Income Marketing Product Line Agglomeration 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince, The Harvard Classics, edited by Charles W. Elliot, LLD (New York: P. F. Collier & Son, 1910) p. 84.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    Thomas J. Peters and Robert H. Waterman, Jr, In Search of Excellence, Lessons from America’s Best-Run Companies (New York: Harper & Row, 1982) pp. 13–15.Google Scholar
  3. 8.
    Excellent descriptions about the early years of the General Motors organization are those of R. D. Chandler, Jr, Strategy and Structure, Chapters in the History of the American Enterprise (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1980) (#37), andGoogle Scholar
  4. 8a.
    Alfred P. Sloan Jr, My Years with General Motors, edited by John McDonald with Catharine Stevens (New York: Doubleday Anchor, 1972).Google Scholar
  5. 9.
    Federal Trade Commission, Report on Motor Vehicle Industry (Washington, 1939) pp. 29–31.Google Scholar
  6. 10.
    Edward L. Allen, Economics of American Manufacturing (New York, 1952), p. 293.Google Scholar
  7. 11.
    R. P. Rumelt, Strategy, Structure and Economic Performance (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1974),Google Scholar
  8. 12.
    Michael Porter, ‘From Competitive Advantage to Corporate Strategy’, Harvard Business Review, May–June 1987, pp. 43–59.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Emilio Cvitkovic 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emilio Cvitkovic

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations