The melodic structures of music and speech: Applications and dimensions of the implication—realization model

  • E. Narmour
Chapter
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series

Abstract

The implication-realization model is a parsimonious, partly formalized hypothetical theory that relies on current psychological research concerned with the real-time perception and cognition of melodic syntax (Narmour, 1977, 1989, 1990, 1991). The rationalistic, bottom-up rules of the theory, which operate on scaled parametric primitives and constrain a highly generalized system of analytical symbols, are context-free, relevant to all styles of melody. In complement, the empirical, top-down rules of the theory, which invoke representative style structures, are context-dependent.

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© The Wenner-Gren Center 1991

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  • E. Narmour

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