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Burns

Cindy LeDuc Jimmerson, Peter Driscoll and Carl Gwinnutt
  • Cindy LeDuc Jimmerson
  • Peter Driscoll
  • Carl Gwinnutt
Chapter

Abstract

The objectives of this chapter are for members of the trauma team to be able:
  • to define burn shock;

  • to list the most common mechanisms of burn injuries;

  • to discuss the three types of respiratory problems associated with smoke inhalation;

  • to describe the recommended order of resuscitation efforts;

  • to determine fluid resuscitation volumes based on burn size and depth, using standard formulae;

  • to determine fluid resuscitation volumes for a patient with an electrical burn;

  • to discuss wound care for surface burns.

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References and further reading

  1. American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma 1993. Advanced Trauma Life Support for Physicians. Chicago: American College of Surgeons.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© P.A. Driscoll, C.L. Gwinnutt, C. LeDuc Jimmerson, O. Goodall 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cindy LeDuc Jimmerson
  • Peter Driscoll
  • Carl Gwinnutt

There are no affiliations available

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