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Defence Policy and Planning in the Caribbean: the Case of Jamaica, 1962–88

  • Humberto García Muniz
Part of the Macmillan International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

By supporting the efforts of others to strengthen their defense, we frequently do as much for our own defense budget. Security assistance to others is a security bargain for us.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Trade Credit Political Violence Internal Security Security Force 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 2.
    See S. G. Neuman, ‘Defense Planning in Less Industrialized States: An Organizing Framework’, in S. G. Neuman (ed.), Defense Planning in Less Industrialized States (Lexington, 1984), pp. 1–27.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    Sir J. Mordecai, The West Indies: The Federal Negotiations (Evanston, 1968), 270.Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    T. Lacey, Violence and Politics in Jamaica 1960–1970 (London, 1970), 159.Google Scholar
  4. 7.
    N. Ahiram, ‘Income Distribution in Jamaica’, Social and Economic Studies (Jamaica), 13, 3, (1965), p. 343.Google Scholar
  5. 12.
    V. A. Lewis, ‘The Caribbean State Systems and Contemporary World Order’, in C. Stone and P. Henry (eds), The Newer Caribbean (Philadelphia, 1983), p. 135.Google Scholar
  6. 12.
    See D. Ronfeldt, Geopolitics, Security and U.S. Strategy in the Caribbean Basin (Santa Monica, 1983), pp. 22–5.Google Scholar
  7. 22.
    Brig Smith fought in the Second World War, joined the JR in the 1950s and went to the Imperial Defence College, London, in 1964. See O.L. Levy and H. P. Jacobs (eds), Personalities Caribbean 1971–1972 (Kingston, 1971), p. 598.Google Scholar
  8. 35.
    M. Manley, Jamaica: The Struggle in the Periphery (London, 1982), p. 37.Google Scholar
  9. 36.
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  10. 38.
    H. Campbell, ‘Crime and Violence in Jamaica Politics’, Caribbean Issues (Trinidad and Tobago), 2, 1976, p. 29.Google Scholar
  11. 42.
    See N. Girvan, R. Bernal and W. Hughes, ‘The IMF and the Third World: The Case of Jamaica, 1974–1980’, Development Dialogue 2, (1980), pp. 113–55 and C. Edie, ‘Domestic Politics and External Relations in Jamaica Under Michael Manley’, Studies in Comparative International Development 21, 1, 1986, pp. 71–94.Google Scholar
  12. 85.
    F. Ambursley, ‘Jamaica: From Michael Manley to Edward Seaga’, in F. Ambursley and R. Cohen (eds), Crisis in the Caribbean, New York, 1983, p. 85.Google Scholar
  13. 113.
    Capt V. H. Anderson (HQ, JDF), ‘Operation “Urgent Fury”’, Alert, 11, July, 1984, p. 21.Google Scholar
  14. 119.
    Lt D. G. Pryce, ‘Exercise “Ocean Venture”’, Alert, 12, August, 1986, P. 9.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Jorge Rodríguez Beruff, J. Peter Figueroa and J. Edward Greene 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Humberto García Muniz

There are no affiliations available

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