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Strategies for Communicating on Innovative Management with Receptive Individuals in Development Organizations

  • Larissa A. Grunig
  • James E. Grunig

Abstract

Development professionals who use their expertise to develop plans and policies for Third World countries face an inevitable dilemma: they seldom, if ever, are in a position or have the power to implement their own ideas. Professionals can do little more than recommend options for employers or sponsors. Decisions on the implementation of plans and policies are made by politicians and administrators — not by the experts who formulate them. (Mtewa, 1980, pp. 36–7).

Keywords

Institutional Policy Communication Behavior Receptive Individual Management Idea Innovative Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mekki Mtewa 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larissa A. Grunig
  • James E. Grunig

There are no affiliations available

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