Advertisement

Recent Industrial Growth and Development in Kenya: Constraints and Prospects for the Future

  • Eckhard Siggel
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Economic development in Kenya during the 1970s and 1980s was characterised by continuous but modest, and at times rapid, economic growth, strong population growth, slowly changing economic structure and large income disparities. Although the modern sector exhibited all the signs of a rapidly developing economy, annual income per person has remained at approximately $300, which puts Kenya into the category of the poorer developing countries.

Keywords

Trade Policy Domestic Demand Import Substitution Industrial Growth Real Effective Exchange Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chenery, H. B. (1960) ‘Patterns of Industrial Growth’, American Economic Review, vol. 50 (September) pp. 624–54.Google Scholar
  2. Chenery, H. B. et al. (1986) Industrialization and Growth. A Comparative Study (New York: Oxford University Press for World Bank).Google Scholar
  3. Chenery, H. B. and Syrquin, M. (1986) ‘Typical Patterns of Transformation’, Ch. 3 in H. B. Chenery et al., Industrialization and Growth. A Comparative Study (New York: Oxford University Press for World Bank).Google Scholar
  4. Collier, P. and Lal, D. (1986) Labour and Poverty in Kenya 1900–80 (Oxford: Clarendon Press).Google Scholar
  5. Coughlin, P. (1983) ‘Converting Crisis to Boom for Kenyan Foundries and Metal Engineering Industries’, working paper no. 398, Institute for Development Studies. University of Nairobi.Google Scholar
  6. Coughlin, P. (1984) ‘Dies, Moulds, and Patterns: Costly Devices Needed for Deepening Import Substitution’, working paper, no. 410, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi.Google Scholar
  7. Coughlin, P. (1985) ‘The Kenyan Steel and Steel-related Industries: A Programme for Domestic Reliance and Export Promotion’, monograph, Economics Department, University of Nairobi.Google Scholar
  8. Coughlin, P. (1986) ‘The Gradual Maturation of an Import Substitution Industry: The Textile Industry in Kenya’, Economics Department, University of Nairobi.Google Scholar
  9. Denison, E. F. (1962) ‘Sources of Economic Growth in the United States and the Alternatives before us’, supplementary paper, 13, Committee for Economic Development, New York.Google Scholar
  10. Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) (1987/88) Country Profile: Kenya. (London: EIU).Google Scholar
  11. Godfrey, M. (1986) Kenya to 1990, special report, no. 1052 (London: The Economist Intelligence Unit).Google Scholar
  12. Gulhati, R. and Sekhar, U. (1982) ‘Industrial Strategy for Late Starters: The Experience of Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia’, World Development, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 949–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Jansen, D. and Selhorst, M. V. (1985) ‘Preliminary Protection and Efficiency Indicators for the Kenyan Manufacturing Sector’, draft report to the Ministry of Planning and National Development, not available for circulation.Google Scholar
  14. Langdon, S. (1978) ‘The Multinational Corporation in the Kenya Political Economy’ in R. Kaplinsky (ed.), Readings on the Multinational Corporation in Kenya (Nairobi: Oxford University Press).Google Scholar
  15. Matthews, R. G. (1985) ‘Machinery Manufacture in the Formal Sector of Kenya’, working paper, no. 425, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi.Google Scholar
  16. Njururi, B. (1989) ‘Tourism Leads a Growing Economy’, African Business, no. 131 (June).Google Scholar
  17. Pack, H. (1987) Productivity, Technology, and Industrial Development. A Case Study in Textiles, A World Bank Research Publication (New York: Oxford University Press).Google Scholar
  18. Phelps, M. G. and Wasow, B. (1970) ‘Measuring Protection and its Effects in Kenya’, working paper, no. 37, Institute for Development Studies, Nairobi.Google Scholar
  19. Republic of Kenya (CBS) Economic Survey, various issues.Google Scholar
  20. Republic of Kenya (CBS) Statistical Abstract, various issues.Google Scholar
  21. Republic of Kenya, Ministry of Planning and National Development, National Development Plan, nos 3, 4, 5 and 6.Google Scholar
  22. Siggel, E. (1987) ‘Import Substitution and Export Performance in the Manufacturing Sector’, internal report to the Long Range Planning Unit, Ministry of Planning and National Development, Nairobi.Google Scholar
  23. Siggel, E. (1988) ‘Productivity Change and Longer-run Growth in Kenya’s Manufacturing Sector’, paper prepared for the Canadian Economics Association meetings, Department of Economics, Concordia University (Montreal).Google Scholar
  24. Siggel, E. (1989) ‘Employment, Earnings and the Income Distribution in Kenya: A Preliminary Investigation of the Modern Sector’, paper prepared for the meetings of Canadian Association for Studies in International Development, Concordia University (Montreal).Google Scholar
  25. Solow, R. (1957) ‘Technical Change and the Aggregate Production Function’, Review of Economics and Statistics, vol. 39 (August) pp. 312–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. World Bank (1987) Kenya: Industrial Sector Policies for Investment and Export Growth, report No. 6711-KE.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eckhard Siggel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsConcordia UniversityMontrealCanada

Personalised recommendations