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Process Synchronisation — Basic Principles

  • Colin J. Theaker
  • Graham R. Brookes
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Computer Science Series book series (COMPSS)

Abstract

Operating systems have so far tended to be regarded as a set of largely independent processes. After all, the functions that are being performed are clearly defined and largely self-contained. In theory, many of these processes could be run in parallel, and if a multiprocessor system were available, then separate processors could be allocated for them. In a single processor system, the processes have to be multiprogrammed, switching from one process to another according to a suitable scheduling algorithm.

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10.9 References and bibliography

  1. E.W. Dijkstra (1968a). ‘Cooperating Sequential Processes’, Programming Languages, (ed. F. Genuys), Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. E.W. Dijkstra (1968b). ‘The Structure of the THE Multiprogramming System’, Communications of the ACM, Vol. 11, pp. 341–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. E.W. Dijkstra (1965). ‘Solution of a Problem in Concurrent Programming Control’, Communications of the ACM, Vol. 8, p. 569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. L. Lamport (1968). ‘The Mutual Exclusion Problem: Part I — A Theory of Interprocess Communication’, Journal of the ACM, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 313–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. L. Lamport (1968). ‘The Mutual Exclusion Problem: Part II — Statement and Solutions’, Journal of the ACM, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 327–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. M. Raynal (1986). Algorithms for Mutual Exclusion, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Colin J. Theaker and Graham R. Brookes 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin J. Theaker
    • 1
  • Graham R. Brookes
    • 2
  1. 1.Staffordshire UniversityUK
  2. 2.Hull UniversityUK

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