The Role of Producer Services in Development: The Case of Singapore

  • Barbara Evers
  • Peter Dicken
  • Colin Kirkpatrick
Part of the Case-Studies in Economic Development book series (CASIED)

Abstract

Services have traditionally been viewed by academics and policy makers as a residual group of economic activities which lack dynamism and make little contribution to the growth process. In this chapter, we aim to emphasise the changing nature of the services sector with the growth of a new category of service activities loosely called producer services, by discussing the important contribution of producer services in the development of the Singapore economy.

Keywords

Income Omic 

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Copyright information

© V. N. Balasubramanyam and John Maynard Bates 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Evers
  • Peter Dicken
  • Colin Kirkpatrick

There are no affiliations available

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