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Luminescence immunoassay

  • Larry Kricka
  • Gary Thorpe
  • Richard Stott

Abstract

Luminescence is a generic term that covers a range of processes which produce light. Two reactions, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, are increasingly being used to monitor immunoassays (1). Chemiluminescence is light emission that arises during the course of a chemical reaction, bioluminescence is a special type of chemiluminescence found in biological systems in which a catalytic protein increases the efficiency of the chemiluminescent reaction. Light is produced when molecules, formed in an electronically excited state, decay to the ground state.

Keywords

Light Emission Chemiluminescent Immunoassay Chemiluminescent Assay Chemiluminescent Reaction Enzyme Label 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Kricka
  • Gary Thorpe
  • Richard Stott

There are no affiliations available

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