The Extent and the Cost of Protection in Developed-Developing Country Trade

  • Bela Balassa

Abstract

The focus of this essay is the measures of protection applied to trade between developed and developing countries. This choice reflects concern with the adverse repercussions of recently imposed protectionist measures in the two groups of countries as well as the increasing importance of mutual trade for their national economies.

Keywords

Sugar Europe Petroleum Rubber Income 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    The table reports import-weighted tariff averages that are relevant for comparisons of overall tariff averages and tariffs on products exported by the developing countries. Unweighted tariff averages show a similar pattern of escalation. Cf. B. Balassa and C. Balassa, ‘Industrial Protection in the Developed Countries,’ The World Economy, VII (1984) pp. 179–86. At the same time, unweighted averages are higher than the weighted averages as the latter is reduced by reason of the fact that high (low) tariffs that discourage (encourage) imports are given low (high) weights.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Bela Balassa 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bela Balassa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins UniversityUSA
  2. 2.The World BankUSA

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