Politics and the State

  • Ronald I. Kowalski
Part of the Studies in Soviet History and Society book series (SSHS)

Abstract

The clash between the Left Communists and Lenin that surfaced in the spring of 1918 over how the revolutionary state was to be constructed rather predictably mirrored the strands of the conflict already examined. Again, the Left Communists accused Lenin of reneging on the libertarian political principles on which, as he had argued repeatedly during 1917, the revolutionary state must be founded. They viewed with horror his preparedness to abandon this programme and to condone the reconstruction of a highly-centralised, bureaucratic dictatorial state to eliminate the chaos and anarchy that threatened the very survival of the infant Soviet republic. They were certain that his betrayal of the vision of 1917, described by Robert Daniels as the dictatorship of the proletariat in the form of a commune state administered from below by the workers themselves, could lead only to the degeneration of the revolution.1

Keywords

Burning Expense Posit Hunt Defend 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Ronald I. Kowalski 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald I. Kowalski
    • 1
  1. 1.Worcester College of Higher EducationUK

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