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Abstract

The politics of food pricing is concerned with two sets of questions: first, what interests and pressures lie behind current policies of market intervention and the generation of political resources, particularly those that do not appear sensible from an economic point of view; second, what changes in political pressures can lead to reform?

Keywords

Food Price Invisible Hand Rural Sector Supply Response Joint Gain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Streeten
    • 1
  1. 1.World Development InstituteBoston UniversityUSA

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