Pavement Maintenance

  • R. J. Salter
Chapter

Abstract

The twentieth century has seen a considerable improvement in the materials and constructional techniques used for highway pavements. This has resulted in a dramatic increase in the life of a pavement from the period when an annual surface dressing was necessary to maintain the shape of the pavement to the present time when design lives of from five to twenty years are common for heavily trafficked highways.

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Copyright information

© R.J. Salter 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Salter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BradfordUK

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